Rita Redberg, MD, MS

Professor

CLINICAL INTERESTS: Dr. Redberg is a general Cardiologist and is interested in preventive cardiology. Her main clinical interests include treatment of all types of heart disease.

RESEARCH INTERESTS: Dr Redberg’s research interests are in our use of medical procedures and devices. She studies the regulatory process for medical devices and the strength of evidence that supports them, particularly high-risk devices, both before and after they are marketed. She is a strong proponent of high-quality data to support safety and effectiveness for medical devices, in order to provide the best quality and appropriate medical care and advice. Dr Redberg has testified before Congress multiple times on these issues.

She is the Editor-in-Chief of JAMA Internal Medicine, a highly ranked international medical journal, and spearheaded the Less is More series highlighting areas of health care with no benefit. Dr Redberg also serves on the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, which advises Congress on medical payment policy.

Dr. Redberg has written, edited and contributed to many books, including "You Can Be a Woman Cardiologist," "Heart Healthy: The Step-by-Step Guide to Preventing and Healing Heart Disease," and "Coronary Disease in Women: Evidence-Based Diagnosis and Treatment."
Education
Post-Doc Fellow/Scholar, 1991 - Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
Clinical Fellowship, 1987 - Cardiology, Columbia Presbyterian
Residency, 1985 - School of Medicine, Columbia Presbyterian
M.D., 1982 - School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
Websites
Publications
  1. Early Noninvasive Cardiac Testing After Emergency Department Evaluation for Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome.
  2. Internal Medicine and COVID-19.
  3. Two Remedies for Inappropriate Percutaneous Coronary Intervention-Closing the Gap Between Evidence and Practice.
  4. Multivessel or Culprit Vessel-Only Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction and Cardiogenic Shock: Real-World Evidence in Support of CULPRIT-SHOCK.
  5. Consistency of trial reporting between ClinicalTrials.gov and corresponding publications: one decade after FDAAA.
  6. Product Hopping-An Expensive and Wasteful Practice.
  7. Notice of Retraction: Panagioti et al. Association Between Physician Burnout and Patient Safety, Professionalism, and Patient Satisfaction: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA Intern Med. 2018;178(10):1317-1331.
  8. Comparison of Priority vs Standard US Food and Drug Administration Premarket Approval Review for High-Risk Medical Devices.
  9. JAMA Internal Medicine-The Year in Review, 2019.
  10. Generating comparative evidence on new drugs and devices before approval.
  11. Automated Identification and Extraction of Exercise Treadmill Test Results.
  12. A Successful but Underused Strategy for Reducing Low-Value Care: Stop Paying for It.
  13. Questioning the Benefit of Statins for Low-risk Populations-Medical Misinformation or Scientific Evidence?
  14. First Physical, Reprised.
  15. Leading the Call for Reform of Medical Device Safety Surveillance.
  16. Miscategorization of Deaths in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Events Database.
  17. Moving From Substantial Equivalence to Substantial Improvement for 510(k) Devices.
  18. Controversies in Diagnostic Imaging of Patients With Suspected Stable and Acute Chest Pain Syndromes.
  19. Evaluation of technologies approved for supplemental payments in the United States.
  20. Interventional Cardiology Payments and Device Choices-The Ties That (May) Blind.
  21. JAMA Internal Medicine-The Year in Review, 2018.
  22. Lisa M. Schwartz, MD, MS, 1963-2018.
  23. The Case for Implementing the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Shared Decision-Making Mandate: Where the Rubber Meets the Code.
  24. Evaluation of Outpatient Cardiac Stress Testing After Emergency Department Encounters for Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome.
  25. Vascular Aging is Accelerated in Flight Attendants with Occupational Secondhand Smoke Exposure.
  26. Effect of a HEART Care Pathway on Chest Pain Management Within an Integrated Health System.
  27. PCI Guided by Fractional Flow Reserve at 5 Years.
  28. Retail Clinics Provide Important Antibiotic Stewardship-Reply.
  29. The Persistent Problem of Overuse of Diagnostic Testing Among House Staff-Time to Move Forward.
  30. Association Between Hospital Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement Volume and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Outcomes.
  31. I Have Insomnia-What Should I Do?
  32. The HEART Score for Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome in U.S. Emergency Departments.
  33. Collaboration between academics and industry in clinical trials: cross sectional study of publications and survey of lead academic authors.
  34. Assessment of Clinical Trial Evidence for High-Risk Cardiovascular Devices Approved Under the Food and Drug Administration Priority Review Program.
  35. Failing Grade for Shared Decision Making for Lung Cancer Screening.
  36. Introducing JAMA Internal Medicine Patient Pages.
  37. Overprescription in Urgent Care Clinics-The Fast and the Spurious.
  38. Promoting FIT Colorectal Cancer Screening.
  39. Trends in Use of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement by Age.
  40. Evolving from volume to value, or to a bolder vision of reimbursement reform?
  41. Rigor in Quality Improvement Studies and the Role of Time-Series Methodologies-Reply.
  42. Evidence-Based Rationale for Use of Inferior Vena Cava Filters-Reply.
  43. JAMA Internal Medicine-The Year in Review, 2017.
  44. Length of hospitalization and mortality for bleeding during treatment with warfarin, dabigatran, or rivaroxaban.
  45. Reducing Harms in Lung Cancer Screening-Bach to the Future.
  46. False Information About Breast Cancer Screening-Reply.
  47. Overuse of Percutaneous Coronary Interventions.
  48. Quality Improvement for Quality Improvement Studies.
  49. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  50. Science Requires Open Discourse.
  51. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  52. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  53. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  54. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  55. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  56. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  57. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  58. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  59. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  60. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  61. Last nail in the coffin for PCI in stable angina?
  62. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography vs Functional Stress Testing for Patients With Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.
  63. New (Very High) Prices on Old Drugs.
  64. The Risk of Remaining Silent: Addressing the Current Threats to Women's Health.
  65. Death by Gun Violence-A Public Health Crisis.
  66. Continued High Rates of IVC Filter Use After US Food and Drug Safety Warning.
  67. Guideline concordance of new statin prescriptions: who got a statin?
  68. Inaccuracies Describing Results of a Lung Cancer Screening Demonstration Project-Reply.
  69. Inclusion of Demographic-Specific Information in Studies Supporting US Food & Drug Administration Approval of High-Risk Medical Devices.
  70. Major Bleeding Risk During Anticoagulation with Warfarin, Dabigatran, Apixaban, or Rivaroxaban in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation.
  71. Sharing Medicine-A JAMA Internal Medicine Series.
  72. Evolocumab in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.
  73. Characteristics of Clinical Studies Used for US Food and Drug Administration Approval of High-Risk Medical Device Supplements.
  74. Cardiac Testing After Emergency Department Evaluation for Chest Pain: Time for a Paradigm Shift?
  75. Setting the Record Straight on FDA Approvals in Oncology-Reply.
  76. Power Morcellators, Postmarketing Surveillance, and the US Food and Drug Administration.
  77. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Regarding Cardiovascular Disease in Women: The Women's Heart Alliance.
  78. High Prevalence and Clinical/Sociodemographic Correlates of Miscarriages Among Flight Attendants.
  79. Physician Adherence to Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations.
  80. The Value of Using Registries to Evaluate Randomized Clinical Trial Study Populations.
  81. Dabigatran Compared With Rivaroxaban vs Warfarin-Reply.
  82. FDA Drug Trials Snapshots-A Clearer Picture.
  83. Saturated fat does not clog the arteries: coronary heart disease is a chronic inflammatory condition, the risk of which can be effectively reduced from healthy lifestyle interventions.
  84. Advancing the Needs of Patients in the Trump Era.
  85. Gender Disparities in Sponsorship-How They Perpetuate the Glass Ceiling.
  86. JAMA Internal Medicine-The Year in Review, 2016.
  87. Update in Cardiology: Evidence Published in 2016.
  88. The Learning Healthcare System and Cardiovascular Care: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.
  89. Important Questions About Lung Cancer Screening Programs When Incidental Findings Exceed Lung Cancer Nodules by 40 to 1.
  90. Improving the Accelerated Pathway to Cancer Drug Approvals.
  91. Physician Work Environment and Well-being: A Call for Papers.
  92. Women in Medicine and Patient Outcomes: Equal Rights for Better Work?
  93. Letter by Dhruva and Redberg Regarding Article, "Sex and Race/Ethnicity Differences in Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Counseling and Use Among Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure: Findings From the Get With The Guidelines-Heart Failure Progra
  94. Colorectal Cancer Screening Comparative Effectiveness-Clinical Trials Are Not Always The Answer-Reply.
  95. Firearm Violence: A JAMA Internal Medicine Series.
  96. Statins for Primary Prevention: The Debate Is Intense, but the Data Are Weak.
  97. Announcing a New JAMA Internal Medicine Website.
  98. The Medicalization of Common Conditions.
  99. Statins for Primary Prevention: The Debate Is Intense, but the Data Are Weak.
  100. Comparing Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants: Where We Are Now.
  101. Notice of Retraction: Sato Y, et al. Risedronate Sodium Therapy for Prevention of Hip Fracture in Men 65 Years or Older After Stroke. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(15):1743-1748.
  102. Notice of Retraction: Sato Y, et al. The Prevention of Hip Fracture With Risedronate and Ergocalciferol Plus Calcium Supplementation in Elderly Women With Alzheimer Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(15):1737-1742.
  103. Availability and Dissemination of Results From US Food and Drug Administration-Mandated Postapproval Studies for Medical Devices.
  104. Fecal Blood Testing or Colonoscopy: What Is the Best Method for Colorectal Cancer Screening?
  105. JAMA Internal Medicine-The Year in Review, 2015.
  106. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels and Statin Treatment-A Moving Target?
  107. Sex-Specific Data for the Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator.
  108. Continuing Use of Prophylactic Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease Despite Evidence of No Benefit: Déjà Vu All Over Again.
  109. Firearm Injuries and Gun Violence: Call for Papers.
  110. Use of Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing Is in the Eye of the Beholder.
  111. An Intervention to Reduce Use of Low-Value Imaging Tests.
  112. Overpowering Images.
  113. Appropriate Use Criteria Require Data.
  114. Would a Breakthrough Therapy by Any Other Name Be as Promising?
  115. Shopping for Direct-to-Consumer Screening: Buyers and Clinicians Beware.
  116. Improving Manufacturer Reporting of Adverse Events to the US Food and Drug Administration.
  117. Conflicts of Interest.
  118. Faster Drug Approvals Are Not Always Better and Can Be Worse.
  119. Health Policy Update 2015: Yet Another Exciting and Turbulent Year Ahead.
  120. Addressing Overuse of Medical Services One Decision at a Time.
  121. Not Breathing Easier With the US FDA's Ban on Chlorofluorocarbons in Inhalers.
  122. On Chlorofluorocarbon Bans and Inhaled Albuterol Prices.
  123. Selective reporting in trials of high risk cardiovascular devices: cross sectional comparison between premarket approval summaries and published reports.
  124. Evidence And Medicare's Coverage Of Interventions.
  125. The role of post-acute care in variation in the Medicare program.
  126. The prescription is laughter.
  127. Health benefits of sauna bathing.
  128. Reporting research misconduct in the medical literature.
  129. Time for professional societies to be bold and wise.
  130. Advancing medical professionalism and the choosing wisely campaign--reply.
  131. Stress testing in the emergency department: not which test but whether any test should be done.
  132. Cardiac patient outcomes during national cardiology meetings.
  133. A new program for sharing medical cost information.
  134. A review of the relationships between endogenous sex steroids and incident ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease events.
  135. The importance of postapproval data for dabigatran.
  136. Assessing the safety and effectiveness of devices after US Food and Drug Administration approval: FDA-mandated postapproval studies.
  137. Approaches to enhancing radiation safety in cardiovascular imaging: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.
  138. Sham controls in medical device trials.
  139. Does CAC testing alter downstream treatment patterns for cardiovascular disease?
  140. The trouble with dabigatran.
  141. Developing methods for less is more.
  142. Hospital admissions for hypoglycemia now exceed those for hyperglycemia in Medicare beneficiaries.
  143. Statins and weight gain.
  144. The high price of the new hepatitis C virus drugs.
  145. Role of noninvasive testing in the clinical evaluation of women with suspected ischemic heart disease: a consensus statement from the American Heart Association.
  146. Charting a roadmap for heart failure biomarker studies.
  147. Premarket approval supplement pathway: do we know what we are getting?
  148. Evaluation of practice patterns in the treatment of atrial fibrillation among the commercially insured.
  149. Health policy update 2014: another exciting and turbulent year ahead.
  150. Response to "Mandatory anesthesia"--reply.
  151. When is it better not to know everything?
  152. Current challenges for clinical trials of cardiovascular medical devices.
  153. How should top-five lists be developed?: what is the next step?
  154. Priorities in the evaluation of patients with chest pain.
  155. Talking about patient preferences.
  156. Medication regimen adherence and patient outcomes.
  157. Statins and musculoskeletal adverse events--reply.
  158. Vertebroplasty: changing levels of evidence and conflict of interest.
  159. Presumed safe no more: lessons from the Wingspan saga on regulation of devices.
  160. Choosing wisely, and soon.
  161. Opening the FDA black box.
  162. Our ongoing digital evolution.
  163. All placebos are not created equally.
  164. My thyroid story.
  165. Mandatory anesthesia.
  166. Appropriate use guidelines in echocardiography and beyond.
  167. Performance measures: better outcomes, not better grades.
  168. Antianginal therapy before percutaneous coronary intervention.
  169. The harm in looking.
  170. JAMA Internal Medicine--a new name and more.
  171. High-sensitivity troponin: elevated without infarction, is the horse out of the barn?
  172. Snack (healthily) before shopping: comment on "Fattening fasting".
  173. Trust in the medical literature--and Viewpoints in JAMA Internal Medicine.
  174. Radiation minimization strategies for medical imaging : comment on "radiation safety in nuclear cardiology-current knowledge and practice".
  175. Improving care for patients with pulmonary hypertension: comment on "Referral of patients with pulmonary hypertension diagnoses to tertiary pulmonary hypertension centers: the multicenter RePHerral study".
  176. Debunking atypical chest pain in women: comment on "Reconstructing angina: cardiac symptoms are the same in women and men".
  177. Mortality in Medicare patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention with or without antecedent stress testing.
  178. Firearm injuries as a public health issue.
  179. Access to cost information. Comment on "Availability of consumer prices from US hospitals for a common surgical procedure".
  180. Online network for adverse event reporting.
  181. An eyedrop by any other name.
  182. Colchicine.
  183. Learning to say no.
  184. Clinical benefit of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: comment on "Discerning the incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic episodes of atrial fibrillation before and after catheter ablation (DISCERN AF)".
  185. Getting to best care at lower cost.
  186. Undertreatment improves, but overtreatment does not.
  187. The 510(k) ancestry of a metal-on-metal hip implant.
  188. FDA regulation of cardiovascular devices and opportunities for improvement.
  189. Statins for people at low risk of cardiovascular disease.
  190. Statins for people at low risk of cardiovascular disease.
  191. Inclusion of comparative effectiveness data in high-risk cardiovascular device studies at the time of premarket approval.
  192. Cardiovascular disease in women.
  193. Cholesterol screening and management in children and young adults should start early--NO!
  194. Laboratory variability and precise clinical decision making.
  195. Reassessing benefits and risks of statins.
  196. Medical device regulation: time to improve performance.
  197. Coronary CT angiography for acute chest pain.
  198. A different perspective regarding prostate-specific antigen testing: in reply.
  199. The JAMA network journals: new names for the archives journals.
  200. CT angiography for possible acute coronary syndrome.
  201. The JAMA Network Journals: New Names for the Archives Journals.
  202. The JAMA Network Journals: New Names for the Archives Journals.
  203. The JAMA Network Journals: New Names for the Archives Journals.
  204. The JAMA Network Journals: New Names for the Archives Journals.
  205. The JAMA Network Journals: new names for the archives journals.
  206. The JAMA Network journals: new names for the archives journals.
  207. Don't assume women are the same as men: include them in the trial.
  208. Just listen and think.
  209. Stress testing and the cardiology top 5: comment on "Exercise testing in asymptomatic patients after revascularization".
  210. Evidence of pharmaceutical innovation and therapeutic enthusiasm: strategies for patent extension.
  211. Dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for nonpacing indications: comment on "variation in use of dual-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillators".
  212. Raising the bar for primary prevention: comment on "cardiovascular primary prevention".
  213. The archives of internal medicine: 2011 recap and looking forward in 2012.
  214. Healthy men should not take statins.
  215. A national interactive web-based physical activity intervention in women, evaluation of the american heart association choose to move program 2006-2007.
  216. Reduced exercise tolerance and pulmonary capillary recruitment with remote secondhand smoke exposure.
  217. Evaluating sex differences in medical device clinical trials: time for action.
  218. Informed strategies for treating coronary disease: comment on "initial coronary stent implantation with medical therapy vs medical therapy alone for stable coronary artery disease".
  219. Important data after drug approval: comment on "Dabigatran association with higher risk of acute coronary events".
  220. Reconsidering transfer for percutaneous coronary intervention strategy: time is of the essence.
  221. Dramatic increases in carotid stenting despite nonconclusive data.
  222. Withdrawing unsafe drugs from the market.
  223. Defining "appropriateness": the devil is in the definition.
  224. Vitamin supplements: more cost than value.
  225. Editor's Note--to make the case--evidence is required: comment on "Making the case for selective use of statins in the primary prevention setting".
  226. Associations between respiratory illnesses and secondhand smoke exposure in flight attendants: A cross-sectional analysis of the Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute Survey.
  227. Sex-specific outcomes for HeartMate II.
  228. Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement.
  229. Medical devices--balancing regulation and innovation.
  230. Earlier nephrology consultation is not associated with improved survival: comment on "Predialysis nephrology care of older patients approaching end-stage renal disease".
  231. The value of history taking in diagnosis: comment on "Utility of clinical examination in the diagnosis of emergency department patients admitted to the department of medicine of an academic hospital".
  232. Relation of increased prebeta-1 high-density lipoprotein levels to risk of coronary heart disease.
  233. PCI for late reperfusion after myocardial infarction continues despite negative OAT trial: less is more.
  234. CRT--less is more: comment on "Impact of QRS duration on clinical event reduction with cardiac resynchronization therapy".
  235. Patterns and intensity of medical therapy in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.
  236. Update in cardiology: evidence published in 2010.
  237. Clinical trial enrollment and progress in women's health.
  238. Diagnostic performance of multislice CCTA: is it ready for clinical use?
  239. Gender bias in studies for Food and Drug Administration premarket approval of cardiovascular devices.
  240. Medical device recalls: get it right the first time: Comment on "Medical device recalls and the FDA approval process".
  241. Transcatheter aortic-valve implantation for aortic stenosis.
  242. Diagnostic tests: another frontier for less is more: or why talking to your patient is a safe and effective method of reassurance.
  243. Inclusion of training patients in US Food and Drug Administration premarket approval cardiovascular device studies.
  244. Accelerated approval and possible withdrawal of midodrine.
  245. Recollection of pain due to inappropriate versus appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks.
  246. Risk refinement, reclassification, and treatment thresholds in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: incremental progress but significant gaps remain.
  247. Medical devices and the FDA approval process: balancing safety and innovation; comment on "prevalence of fracture and fragment embolization of bard retrievable vena cava filters and clinical implications including cardiac perforation and tamponade".
  248. Impact of changes in clinical practice guidelines on assessment of quality of care.
  249. Health reform: a good year for the country, a good year for the archives.
  250. Less is more: how less health care can result in better health.
  251. Exercise blood pressure and future cardiovascular death in asymptomatic individuals.
  252. Less is more.
  253. Low diagnostic yield of elective coronary angiography.
  254. First physical.
  255. What is the prognostic value of a zero calcium score?
  256. Cardiovascular disease in women.
  257. The need for sex-specific data prior to food and drug administration approval.
  258. Scoring a goal [for prevention].
  259. Strength of study evidence examined by the FDA in premarket approval of cardiovascular devices.
  260. Cancer risks and radiation exposure from computed tomographic scans: how can we be sure that the benefits outweigh the risks?
  261. ACC 2009 Advocacy Position Statement: Principles for comparative effectiveness research.
  262. ACCF/AHA 2009 performance measures for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures (Writing Committee to Develop Performanc
  263. AHA/ACCF [corrected] 2009 performance measures for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association task force on performance measures (writing committee to develo
  264. Is what is good for the gander really good for the goose?
  265. Use of stress testing prior to percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with stable coronary artery disease.
  266. Pulmonary function abnormalities in never-smoking flight attendants exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke in the aircraft cabin.
  267. CMS's landmark decision on CT colonography--examining the relevant data.
  268. The beginning of a new era for the Archives and the nation.
  269. Partnering to reduce risks and improve cardiovascular outcomes: American Heart Association initiatives in action for consumers and patients.
  270. Pay now, benefits may follow--the case of cardiac computed tomographic angiography.
  271. Frequency of stress testing to document ischemia prior to elective percutaneous coronary intervention.
  272. Improving the quality of care for women with cardiovascular disease: report of a DCRI Think Tank, March 8 to 9, 2007.
  273. Why physicians favor use of percutaneous coronary intervention to medical therapy: a focus group study.
  274. High prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors in women considered low risk by traditional risk assessment.
  275. Dispelling the myths: calling for sex-specific reporting of trial results.
  276. Imaging for coronary risk assessment: ready for prime time?
  277. Variations between clinical trial participants and Medicare beneficiaries in evidence used for Medicare national coverage decisions.
  278. Remote second-hand tobacco exposure in flight attendants is associated with systemic but not pulmonary hypertension.
  279. The role of sex-specific results reporting in cardiovascular disease.
  280. Disparities in use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: moving beyond process measures to outcomes data.
  281. A systematic review of gender differences in mortality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery and percutaneous coronary interventions.
  282. Better evidence for real healthcare reform.
  283. Cardiologists' use of percutaneous coronary interventions for stable coronary artery disease.
  284. The appropriateness imperative.
  285. Computed tomographic angiography: more than just a pretty picture?
  286. Noninvasive cardiac imaging.
  287. Evidence-based guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention in women: 2007 update.
  288. ACC/AHA 2007 methodology for the development of clinical data standards: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Data Standards.
  289. Evidence-based guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention in women: 2007 update.
  290. ACC/AHA 2007 methodology for the development of clinical data standards: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Data Standards.
  291. Low rate of sex-specific result reporting in cardiovascular trials.
  292. ACCF/AHA 2007 clinical expert consensus document on coronary artery calcium scoring by computed tomography in global cardiovascular risk assessment and in evaluation of patients with chest pain: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Cl
  293. ACCF/AHA 2007 clinical expert consensus document on coronary artery calcium scoring by computed tomography in global cardiovascular risk assessment and in evaluation of patients with chest pain: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Cl
  294. Evidence, appropriateness, and technology assessment in cardiology: a case study of computed tomography.
  295. Primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in people with diabetes mellitus: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association.
  296. The prognostic value of normal exercise myocardial perfusion imaging and exercise echocardiography: a meta-analysis.
  297. Primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in people with diabetes mellitus: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association.
  298. ACC/AHA/HRS 2006 key data elements and definitions for electrophysiological studies and procedures: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Data Standards (ACC/AHA/HRS Writing Committee to Develop D
  299. ACC/AHA/HRS 2006 key data elements and definitions for electrophysiological studies and procedures: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Data Standards (ACC/AHA/HRS Writing Committee to Develop D
  300. Gender differences in acute coronary syndrome: invasive versus conservative approach.
  301. ACCF/ACR/SCCT/SCMR/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SIR 2006 appropriateness criteria for cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Quality Strategic Directions Committee Appropriateness C
  302. Sex differences in major bleeding with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors: results from the CRUSADE (Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation of the ACC/AHA guidelines) initiative.
  303. Screening asymptomatic diabetic patients for coronary artery disease: why not?
  304. Coronary artery calcium: should we rely on this surrogate marker?
  305. What does the Medicare prescription drug legislation mean for the American cardiologist?
  306. Gender, race, and cardiac care: why the differences?
  307. ACC/AHA key data elements and definitions for measuring the clinical management and outcomes of patients with chronic heart failure: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Data Standards (Writing C
  308. Enhanced risk assessment in asymptomatic individuals with exercise testing and Framingham risk scores.
  309. Vitamin E and cardiovascular health: does sex matter?
  310. Revascularization for everyone?
  311. Role of noninvasive testing in the clinical evaluation of women with suspected coronary artery disease: Consensus statement from the Cardiac Imaging Committee, Council on Clinical Cardiology, and the Cardiovascular Imaging and Intervention Committee, Coun
  312. Utility of stress testing and coronary calcification measurement for detection of coronary artery disease in women.
  313. ACC/AHA key data elements and definitions for measuring the clinical management and outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Data Standards (Writing Com
  314. Acute coronary syndromes in women: is treatment different? Should it be?
  315. ACC/AHA key data elements and definitions for measuring the clinical management and outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Data Standards (Writing Com
  316. Women's Ischemic Syndrome Evaluation: current status and future research directions: report of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute workshop: October 2-4, 2002: Section 2: stable ischemia: pathophysiology and gender differences.
  317. Women's Ischemic Syndrome Evaluation: current status and future research directions: report of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute workshop: October 2-4, 2002: executive summary.
  318. Gender and valvular surgery.
  319. Coronary artery calcium and cardiac events.
  320. Diagnosing heart disease.
  321. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease in women.
  322. Effect of intracoronary estradiol on postischemic microvascular damage in a porcine model: a myocardial contrast echocardiographic study.
  323. Ability of exercise testing to predict cardiovascular and all-cause death in asymptomatic women: a 20-year follow-up of the lipid research clinics prevalence study.
  324. Are there sex differences in risk factors for coronary heart disease? Maternal versus paternal transmission.
  325. 34th Bethesda Conference: Task force #3--What is the spectrum of current and emerging techniques for the noninvasive measurement of atherosclerosis?
  326. Coronary calcium: is racial profiling necessary?
  327. Prevention Conference VI: Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease: Writing Group III: risk assessment in persons with diabetes.
  328. Prevention Conference VI: Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease: executive summary: conference proceeding for healthcare professionals from a special writing group of the American Heart Association.
  329. Coronary Heart Disease in Women: Hormone Replacement Therapy.
  330. A review of electron beam computed tomography: implications for coronary artery disease screening.
  331. Pharmacologic stress testing for coronary disease diagnosis: A meta-analysis.
  332. An evaluation of Choose to Move 1999: an American Heart Association physical activity program for women.
  333. Power motion imaging can improve image quality in stress conditions with tachycardia.
  334. From clinical trials to public health policy: the path from imaging to screening.
  335. Diagnostic strategies for women with suspected coronary artery disease.
  336. The ten most commonly asked questions about hormone replacement therapy.
  337. Usefulness of stroke distance by echocardiography as a surrogate marker of cardiac output that is independent of gender and size in a normal population.
  338. Noninvasive diagnostic testing of coronary artery disease in women.
  339. Plasma apolipoprotein L concentrations correlate with plasma triglycerides and cholesterol levels in normolipidemic, hyperlipidemic, and diabetic subjects.
  340. Lack of association of C-reactive protein and coronary calcium by electron beam computed tomography in postmenopausal women: implications for coronary artery disease screening.
  341. Awareness, perception, and knowledge of heart disease risk and prevention among women in the United States. American Heart Association Women's Heart Disease and Stroke Campaign Task Force.
  342. Rate of change in aortic valve area during a cardiac cycle can predict the rate of hemodynamic progression of aortic stenosis.
  343. Long-term estrogen replacement therapy is associated with improved exercise capacity in postmenopausal women without known coronary artery disease.
  344. Lack of association of lipoprotein(a) levels with coronary calcium deposits in asymptomatic postmenopausal women.
  345. Prevention Conference V: Beyond secondary prevention: identifying the high-risk patient for primary prevention: tests for silent and inducible ischemia: Writing Group II.
  346. Current evidence on diagnostic testing in women with suspected coronary artery disease: choosing the appropriate test.
  347. Roundtable discussion ... cardiovascular disease management programs.
  348. The epidemiology of cardiovascular disease in women.
  349. Diagnosis of suspected coronary artery disease in women: a cost-effectiveness analysis.
  350. Guide to Preventive Cardiology for Women.AHA/ACC Scientific Statement Consensus panel statement.
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  355. Gender and willingness to undergo invasive cardiac procedures.
  356. Demonstration of penetrating intramyocardial coronary arteries with high-frequency transthoracic echocardiography and Doppler in human subjects.
  357. Coronary artery disease in women: understanding the diagnostic and management pitfalls.
  358. Passive smoking and heart disease.
  359. Age, body-mass index, and mortality.
  360. Prebeta-1 HDL in plasma of normolipidemic individuals: influences of plasma lipoproteins, age, and gender.
  361. Diagnostic testing for coronary artery disease in women and gender differences in referral for revascularization.
  362. Immediate effects of intravenous cocaine on the thoracic aorta and coronary arteries. A transesophageal echocardiographic study.
  363. Diagnosis of primary cardiac leiomyosarcoma by endomyocardial biopsy.
  364. Adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation during transesophageal Doppler echocardiography. Rapid and safe measurement of coronary flow reserve ratio can predict significant left anterior descending coronary stenosis.
  365. Transesophageal echocardiography predicts mortality in critically ill patients with unexplained hypotension.
  366. Abnormal pulmonary artery pressure profile after cardiac transplantation: an exercise Doppler echocardiographic study.
  367. Coronary to pulmonary artery fistula detected by transthoracic echocardiography.
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  371. Exercise Doppler echocardiography identifies abnormal hemodynamics in adults with congenital heart disease.
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  374. Unusual case of total pulsus alternans that resulted from varying afterload caused by a subclavian artery rupture.
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  377. Right ventricular outflow tract obstruction: augmented diagnosis with biplane transesophageal echocardiography.
  378. Transesophageal echocardiography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
  379. Transesophageal echocardiography in the evaluation of mitral regurgitation. The twenty-four signs of severe mitral regurgitation.
  380. Transesophageal echocardiography. Indications and technical considerations.
  381. Use of transesophageal echocardiography in evaluating coronary arteries.
  382. Noninvasive assessment of the pulmonary artery pressure response to exercise after uncomplicated heart transplantation.
  383. Pulsed Doppler characterization of left atrial appendage flow.
  384. Effect of selective angiotensin II receptor antagonism and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on the coronary vasculature in vivo. Intravascular two-dimensional and Doppler ultrasound studies.
  385. Transesophageal echocardiographically detected atherosclerotic aortic plaque is a marker for coronary artery disease.
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  387. Transesophageal echocardiographic detection of abnormalities of the tricuspid valve in adults associated with spontaneous closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defect.
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